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07:21 AM / 15th November 2021
Blog

Feng Shui in the garden - Design Theory by James Ashfield - Interior Design Director

As the warmer weather has arrived we’ve been spending more time outdoors and thinking about the connection between the interior and exterior of our projects. The garden is a great place to fuse together architecture and nature. At Rigby and Rigby we’ve been researching and exploring the design principle of Feng Shui. A garden that has been designed using the Feng Shui principles offers a calm & energising environment that promotes good chi (energy).

, Feng Shui in the garden – Design Theory by James Ashfield – Interior Design Director

The literal translation of ‘Feng’ & ‘Shui’ is ‘wind’ and ‘water’. In eastern culture, both of these principles are associated with good health and they can be embraced across the home especially in the garden. Homes & architecture often have strong lines and bold forms that contradict the natural form & flow of nature – the garden is an area to utilise the man made and the natural. A landscaped garden with an ordered but organic design is a great combination where nature is sculpted to create key focal points.

, Feng Shui in the garden – Design Theory by James Ashfield – Interior Design Director

Feng Shui has five main elements – fire, metal, wood, earth & water. To create harmony it’s important to strike the right balance between the different items and the Bagua map, a system to help locate and zone the energy, can be used to position each item. Below are some good examples to consider in garden design:

  • Placing red flowers in the south facing sector will resemble fire and success.
  • Fire can also be represented by a chiminea and provides a good evening focal point for socialising.
  • Healthy flowers and abundant fruit are signs of health, prosperity & good Feng Shui.
  • Straight lines are uncommon in nature so balance rectangular planters with softer organic shapes and avoid thorns and sharp objects

, Feng Shui in the garden – Design Theory by James Ashfield – Interior Design Director

, Feng Shui in the garden – Design Theory by James Ashfield – Interior Design Director