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Our World

11:19 AM / 21st November 2022
News

Charles II Granted Planning Permission

Rigby & Rigby are proud to have obtained two successful planning permissions to de-risk the planning process and mitigate any possible programme delays for a private client. The schemes submitted for planning consisted of two options within a property located in Chelsea, London. The brief involved renovating and extending a recently built mews-style house. The property is within a gated development. A private family will occupy it as their London base. The programme consists of 3 bedrooms, a principal dressing room, 3 bathrooms, a drawing room, a kitchen/dining room, a conservatory, a garage and a garden. In total it consists of approximately 3,000 sqft.

, Charles II Granted Planning Permission

Our architectural concept is derived from Francis Ching’s, Form, Space and Order. Published originally in 1979, Ching’s book highlights the basic vocabulary of architectural design. It examines how form and space are ordered within the built environment. These seminal ideas allow a critical understanding of architecture which we felt inspired to incorporate within this project. We have applied this in the consideration of light, viewpoints, openings, and enclosures. The client had the desire to create a homely space which was explored in the spatial arrangement of the rooms. We have been able to elevate the unique details and characters which we observed in the existing building. In contrast, this enabled the extension to be designed in a contemporary fashion, but harmoniously frames the existing and proposed. 

, Charles II Granted Planning Permission

In terms of planning, two options were presented to the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea. The first is a series of arched fenestrations and the second is a more traditional rectilinear series of openings, mirroring the floors above. The strategy to provide multiple options for planning applications allowed us to gain a competitive time advantage. This is in case one option was considered too confrontational for the planning officers. In the Summer of 2022, both scheme options were approved. As quoted by Savills our planning consultancy team ‘The proposed rear extension is subservient, and the overall design complements the host property. It will have no harmful impact on the neighbouring properties and a decent size rear garden is retained. Surface water drainage will also be significantly improved because of the proposals by providing a 52% increase in the permeable surface. The proposed development complies with the development plan and the NPPF. The Council is therefore respectfully requested to grant planning permission.’ 

, Charles II Granted Planning Permission

The design of the extension not only adds valuable net internal area to the existing building but also attracts further natural light into the space which is proposed to be the family living/dining room. The design is also sympathetic to the various architectural orders, from the brick recess of the extension to the restoration of existing architectural details. The interior design of the scheme mainly consists of neutral colours layered with refined accents such as Sage green, in the typical Rigby & Rigby style of refined luxury, paying particular attention to finishes, detailing and materiality to create the desired outcome. We are working closely with an award-winning landscape architect to deliver the important link and consider the external environment. 

, Charles II Granted Planning Permission

Overall, we are delighted to have obtained permission for this proposal to help our client’s vision come to life and create future value for our client. We are pleased that they have also chosen to proceed with the contemporary scheme now that we have the benefit of full consent. Our design and delivery teams will successfully combine and coordinate the realisation of this family and hope to make a timeless and beautiful piece of architecture.